Sunday , 22 October 2017
Candle In The Wind – Nollywood Movie

Candle In The Wind – Nollywood Movie

Candle In The Wind – Nollywood Movie | FREE DOWNLOAD | TORRENT | HD 1080p | x264 | WEB-DL | DD5.1 | H264 | MP4 | 3GP | WATCH ONLINE | 720p | DVD | Bluray.

candle in the wind
Candle In The Wind

An old man traces his lost daughter to ask for forgiveness by narrating his past experiences with his first love, wealth, power and regrets after selling his life and self-esteem to acquire wealth and dining with the devil making him lose all he ever cherished.

Starring
Jackie Appiah, James Gardiner, Christabel Ekeh, Helen Asante, Timothy Bentum, Michelle McKinney Hammond, Joseph Sahyody, Kingsley Yamoah

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  5. CANDLE IN THE WIND (NOLLYWOOD, 2016).Some scenes of the lush green vegetation at the opening of the movie hardly seemed like tropical locations. Nonetheless it was a welcome departure from usual hotel rooms and busy urban streets.

    I am happy today to see mega-star Christabel Ekeh (playing Efya) appearing in a movie with her natural hair. I first saw her several years ago in a high school movie that told stories of the dangers of high school girls sneaking off campus to spend time with rich and powerful men in their communities who have a taste for high school girls. She was beautiful then, and is beautiful now. I have seen her severally since then.

    To see more of Christabel Ekeh appearing in movies dressed up with her natural hair and pure unvarnished hairstyle, in beautiful metropolitan settings, rather than as a mere village-girl, would likely do so much for the psyche of young girls and women, some of whom are trying to find or establish their identities, and some trying to project images of beauty to say who they are. Production of Nollywood-Gallywood movies is an area, and one of numerous opportune media platforms where African women can reclaim their originality, their original cultural identity, and define or redefine indigenous fashion trends.

    Other seasoned actresses/mega-stars have played roles with their natural hair in ‘unvarnished’ styles, but mostly in the village-girl context – Bukola Awoyemi in Arugba; Mercy Johnson; Ini Edo; Yvonne Nelson; Okawa Shaznay; Yvonne Okoro in Rebecca; even the young Belinda Effah in Bambitious. Some actresses have the confidence to appear in movies the way they appear in real life with their own natural hair in unvarnished hairstyles: Nse Ikpe Etim in the movie The Visit; Lupita Nyong’o in several productions in Kenya and abroad, and Labelle Vitien in The Novelist, to name a few. Lupita and Labelle have grown to be so confident of their wholesome beauty that they go without hair entirely, and they are loved, seemingly everywhere. Young actress Sika Osei showed off her natural unvarnished hairstyles while she was dressed-up in metropolis in the movie Grey Dawn.

    Restricting the wearing of natural unvarnished hairstyles to village-girls and house-girls in movies reinforces and perpetuates the stereotypes, and likely has the effect of deterring young women and girls from wearing their own natural hair in natural and unvarnished hairstyles when they dress up. I suspect that many in the industry would like to explore natural hair more vigorously in other than the ‘village-girl’ context, but, I suspect, a greater percentage of viewers have come to respond to unnatural hair and ‘varnished’ hairstyles as ‘more beautiful!’ Some may even say that natural hair and varnished hairstyles are not a reflection of “reality.”

    Hair aside, the movie was excellent. The movie describes how depraved people’s actions can be when they elevate the pursuit of money above the sanctity of life and the blessings of love, of family, should-be-loved-ones and friends! It is okay that this movie did not explore the legal consequences of George’s (played by James Gardiner) actions. That seems to have been in exchange for showing instead what can be the self-inflicted consequences to the fool who sells his soul for money.

    While stories like this suggests that people should pull back from the ruthless pursuit of money, a noble admonishment mostly for the have-nots, more movies should explore more of the empowering details of what’s at stake and how to properly pursue money while playing within the old systems, or even within new ones yet developed. I believe in the creative genius and abilities of Nollywood & Ghallywood writers and producers enough to dare to suggest it.

    I don’t suggest that the industry take on the task of teaching business management courses, or even Western financing practices, to the masses of its viewers. But surely the creative genius of writers and producers can select and expose palatable modules composed of elements of business, or elements of financing, even renewed respect for the value of farming, within the stories, within the dialogues running slowly and digestably alongside the main themes of the stories, and so on, and so on. While I have no problem with how the movie made its point, I would love to see more movies that exalt, expand, and dwell on the preferred value of the lives of have-nots, the voiceless, and those of lesser stature in our society. Such stories have the potential to evoke deep emotions in viewers, much like the well-worn love stories do. They can teach us to love each other.

    Lydia’s mom had acquired substantial wealth operating a factory. But her actions did not make clear what motivated her, or what purpose or pursuits in life she had beyond the exercise of ruthless, unchecked power over the people she employed. Unchallenged, her ruthless expression to George that she owned him, seemed repugnant when seen against the background of some of our darker history, especially since even after that declaration George went along spinelessly and without resistance! Sure, the character deserved to die, and she died a relatively untortured, painless death, but only to make way for George’s enrichment. It was a death barely befitting of the life she led. (I say this also in the spirit of the nontraditional, almost anti-traditional idea that funerals are for the living, not for the dead!)

    While art can reflect the reality of society, it can also cleanse some of the misgivings of a society. I believe that writers and producers should write less stories that reinforce images and mental states that beset communities on the continent, and more stories that inspire action In areas of leadership, teamwork, innovation, etc..

    The story, Candles in The Wind, is simple enough to make its point to a wide audience. The movie made the point very well, hopefully without abusing viewers sensitivities too much. My suggestions here are not for what else this story could be. Rather it’s a suggestion of what next these creative writers and producers could present to yearning viewers.

    For those people who find interest in reading the credits at the end of the movies, Bernie Anti made it enjoyable by combining mood-enhancing music played with instruments that effectively sounded like a cross between a muted trumpet and a trombone. Mind you, the music was appropriately enhancing throughout, weaving measured interludes of strings, percussions and horns beautifully. In the end, the music conveyed the solemnity of the occasion of Gina’s (Helen Asante) return home to Colin (Pascal Amanfo, Co-Director and actor); the pain of the previously avoidable, now irreversible outcomes; and the uncertainty of which way forward?

    Forgive me for making my ‘comment’ into a mini essay! It is what the movie provoked in me. It is my hope that this movie provokes deep thoughts and broad spectrum of ideas in other viewers as well. 25June2017

  6. Where and when will I and others see my comments after posting?

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